22.8 C
Los Angeles
Saturday, June 15, 2024

London Underground strike: What you need to know

BlogLondon Underground strike: What you need to know

Why are the Tube workers striking?

Members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union (RMT) voted to take industrial action over a pay dispute and are carrying out the strike.

The union rejected a below-inflation pay increase of 5%, which transport bosses said was “the most we can afford”.

The union said the offer was “insulting” and “derisory”, and demanded a fair and realistic pay rise that reflects the cost of living in London.

How will the strike affect Tube services?

The strike will affect various parts of the Tube network. With “little or no service” expected to run between Sunday evening and Friday morning, according to TfL.

The officials advised all passengers to complete their journeys by 17:30 GMT on Sunday, before the strike started at 18:00 GMT.

TfL said it would try to keep some lines open for longer. Those serving the Emirates stadium, where Arsenal host Liverpool in the FA Cup on Sunday evening.

However, severe disruption is expected for most of the week. With very few services running on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.

The Tube will return to a normal service by midday on Friday.

Passengers are encouraged by TfL to use alternate forms of transportation, such as buses, trams, trains, bikes, or walking, and to check the TfL website for the most recent information on what services are operating.

How will the strike affect the hospitality sector?

The strike is expected to have a negative impact on the hospitality sector, as fewer commuters are likely to travel into the city during the strike.

UK Hospitality, a trade body representing the sector, has warned the strike could cost the sector up to £50m, as many businesses rely on customers from the Tube network. Kate Nicholls, the chief executive of UK Hospitality, said the strike would make the start of the year even more challenging for the sector, which is already facing a quiet trading month in January.

She said thousands of hospitality businesses would be affected by the strike, and urged the union and the transport bosses to resolve the dispute as soon as possible.

FAQs

When will the strike end?

The strike will end at 11:59 GMT on Thursday, and the Tube will return to a normal service by midday on Friday.

How can I find out what services are running?

You can find out what services are running on the Transport for London (TfL) website, or by using the Transport for London app, Twitter or Facebook.

You can also contact Transport for London by phone on 0343 222 1234, or by email at tfl.gov.uk/help-and-contact.

What are the alternative transport options?

Locals can use other modes of transport such as buses, trams, trains, bikes or walking.

They can plan their journey using the TfL journey planner, or by using apps such as Citymapper or Google Maps.

Can also use the Santander Cycles scheme, which offers bike hire across London.

Find out more about the scheme on the TfL website, or by using the Santander Cycles app.

Summary

  • A series of walkouts by union members will affect Tube services from Sunday evening to Friday morning.
  • Transport for London has advised people to complete their journeys by 17:30 GMT on Sunday, and to check the Transport for London website for details of what services are running
  • UK Hospitality has warned the strike could cost the sector up to £50m, as fewer commuters are expected to travel into the city

Sources

Source 1

Source 2

Check out our other content

Check out other tags:

Most Popular Articles